FREE Consultation (866) 848-7077

Generic drug recall exemplifies underlying safety issues


Posted On behalf of Michael D'Amico of D'Amico & Pettinicchi, LLC on Jun 30, 2014 in Wrongful Death

For many people, it makes sense to take a generic version of a medication. After all, name-brand drugs tend to be much more expensive than generic equivalents. Since there should be no difference in the chemical composition between these two kinds of drugs, it seems like a no brainer to opt for the more affordable medication. This attitude is understandable in the context of rising health care costs.

Over time, there have been emerging concerns about generic drugs produced overseas. Although sending drug production offshore might be a great way to cut costs, quality should never be sacrificed.

Not long ago, two drug manufacturers announced recalled 100,000 bottles of the generic equivalent for Toprol XL, a heart medication. It appears as though the generic drugs were not dissolving properly after being consumed, which creates concerns about effectiveness. Based on the way the recall was classified by the FDA, taking the generic version of Toprol could result in certain health issues.

According to a report, issues with generic version of this drug have come to the attention of the Food and Drug Administration in the past. One cardiologist at a leading medical institution noted that his patients experienced problems with the generic version of the Toprol, but not the name-brand medication. The doctor made his concerns known, yet they were brushed off by regulators.

When prescription drugs are sold by manufacturers as a substitute for a name-brand product, consumers have every right to believe that they will not suffer serious or fatal injuries. Additional, doctors and pharmacists should generally be able to make the same assumption. With this in mind, it is the responsibility of drug companies to make sure their products are made safely and accurately.

Source: The New York Times, "Generic Versions of Toprol XL, a Heart Drug, Are Recalled," Katie Thomas, June 23, 2014