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Are brain injuries to blame for violent behavior?


Posted on behalf of Michael D'Amico of D'Amico & Pettinicchi, LLC on Sep 25, 2014 in Brain Injuries

By now it is likely that even those who are not fans of professional football have heard about the domestic abuse charges a couple of popular players are currently facing. While the ramifications for those alleged violent acts are playing out both in their workplace as well as the criminal court system, some are wondering, what, if anything severe traumatic brain injuries suffered in the course of their careers may play. 

According to a professor of neurosurgery and director of the Center for Brain Injury and Repair at the University of Pennsylvania, one of the most common aspects of severe TBI is aggression. While there is no definitive research that directly links these injuries and aggression, scientists point out that the frontal lobe is most at risk of being injured when someone plays a sport like football and that repeated jolts to the head can lead to the same symptoms as one big blow. Those symptoms include individuals becoming less inhibited. This inhibition in turn could prevent someone from stopping themselves before engaging in violent behaviors. Brain injuries can result in other symptoms as well such as headaches and difficulties concentrating.

Whether research to definitely link the two will be conducted remains to be seen. In the meantime, individuals are living with the brain injuries and the accompanying symptoms. Dealing with these symptoms can result in a dramatic change in the life of the affected person as well as his or her family and loved ones. It can also be expensive.

When a brain injury is due to negligence on the part of another person, it is possible that a personal injury lawsuit could result in the recovery of damages. A personal injury lawyer is the best place to start to determine whether such a claim is viable.

Source: NBC News, "Could Brain Injuries Be Behind the NFL Rap Sheet?" Linda Carroll, Sept. 17, 2014