FREE Consultation (866) 848-7077

Some think video cameras in nursing homes would improve safety


Posted on behalf of Michael D'Amico of D'Amico & Pettinicchi, LLC on Oct 01, 2014 in Nursing Home Abuse

No one wants to see someone they love hurt. This is true regardless of the age of the loved one and extends to the elderly or those unable to care for themselves who live in nursing homes where they receive care around the clock. As readers are likely aware residents of nursing homes are injured all too often. Sometimes these injuries are the result of abuse while on other occasions they are instead due to neglect. One state is considering the use of cameras to monitor nursing homes to help combat those issues. 

Those who advocate the monitoring believe that when neglect or abuse does occur, the recordings could help to determine who was involved and hold those individuals responsible for the activity. In addition, their presence could reduce the neglect or abuse that does occur.

Those against the use of cameras cite consent and privacy as a concern. More specifically they question who would be able to give consent for the recordings and what sorts of privacy rights roommates, visitors and staff would have. In addition they are worried about exactly what would be done with the recordings.

The proposal the state is considering would allow recording devices in cases where a resident provides his or her consent and the costs are covered.

While this proposal is not being considered in the state of Connecticut, it is possible that some day it could. So far five other states currently allow the practice and the seemingly never ending technological advances will probably make this cheap and easy to do.

When abuse or neglect does occur in nursing homes the resident or his or her loved ones could pursue legal action against the responsible parties.

Source: The Chicago Tribune, “Should video cameras be used in nursing homes" Wes Venteicher, Sept. 8, 2014