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As popularity of biking grows throughout nation so too do deaths


Posted on behalf of Mark F. Griffin of D'Amico & Pettinicchi, LLC on Jan 21, 2015 in Pedestrian Accidents

Individuals who are struck by cars while walking are not the only type of pedestrian that could find they are injured in such an accident. Bicyclists too can be hurt when a motor vehicle hits them. While the number of bicyclists who take to the road this time of year in Connecticut is likely sparser than during summer months, the issue of bicycle deaths in the U.S. is highlighted in the results of a study recently released.

The study notes that throughout the nation the number fatalities due to bike accidents are on the rise. This increase, which started in 2010, comes after a 35 year decrease.

More specifically, the study, which was published by the Governors Highway Safety Association, found that in 2012, nationwide, more than 700 bicyclists died. Of those individuals, 84 percent were adults. Seventy four percent were adult males. It is unclear how many of these accidents involved motor vehicles.

There are multiple factors that are believed to have played a role in these numbers. The first is that bicycling is a popular mode of transportation for those travelling to and from work. It is also a popular form of exercise for those looking to improve their health.

While not all bicycle accidents are the result of motor vehicle accidents, it is important for those behind the wheel to take the steps necessary to watch for bicyclists. There are also things that those riding bikes can do, including:

  • Not riding after consuming alcohol.
  • Wearing bright colors.
  • When biking at night, wearing reflective clothing and attaching a light to the bike.
  • Wearing a helmet that fits properly.

In situations when a bicyclist is hurt or killed in a bicycle accident that is the fault of another person, such as the driver of a car, it is possible that a lawsuit could follow.

Source: 13 ABC, “U.S. bicyclist deaths on the rise," Alex Kramer, Jan. 3, 2015